• Document: Typhoon Haiyan. S h e l t e r C a s e S t u d i e s. J a n u a r y Haiyan Shelter Case Studies i
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Typhoon Haiyan Shelter Case Studies January 2017 Haiyan Shelter Case Studies i Cover A shelter starts to take shape in Eastern Samar utilizing locally sourced materials that draw from the abundance of downed coconut trees. The shelter, like many others constructed after Haiyan, incorporates ‘build back better’ principles, such as concrete foundations, bracing, and stronger connections. Photo by Aaron Opdyke Acknowledgements Lead Author Aaron Opdyke PhD Candidate | Construction Engineering and Management USAID/OFDA Humanitarian Shelter and Settlements Fellow Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering University of Colorado Boulder Contributing Authors Amy Javernick-Will, PhD Associate Professor Nicholas R. and Nancy D. Petry Professor in Construction Engineering and Management Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering Associate Director for Graduate Education and Research Mortenson Center in Engineering for Developing Communities University of Colorado Boulder Matthew Koschmann, PhD Associate Professor Department of Communication University of Colorado Boulder Photographs Aaron Opdyke (unless otherwise noted) For their contributions to this report, the authors would like to thank: Shaye Palagi (University of Colorado Boulder), Yvonne Su (University of Guelph), Ladylyn Mangada (University of the Philippines Visayas Tacloban College), Roos Groen (University of Amsterdam), and Phoebe Tabo (Philippine Red Cross) for contributing commentary pieces on aspects of shelter recovery. Charles Setchell (USAID/OFDA) and Kip Scheidler (Habitat for Humanity) for their support and guidance. Marielle Bacason (Research Assistant), Phoebe Tabo (Research Assistant), Lebeth Manguilimotan (Research Assistant), and Jairus Josol (Research Assistant) for conducting interviews, focus groups, and surveys. Emlou Tansingco (Transcriptionist), Donna Conde (Transcriptionist), Joyce Kirui (Transcriptionist), and Emily Andrade (Transcriptionist) for their translation and transcription. Haiyan Shelter Case Studies i The following organizations (in no particular order) whose programs have been included: Association for Aid and Relief (AAR) Japan, Act Alliance, All Hands Volunteers, Build Change, Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Cordaid, Gawad Kalinga (GK), German Red Cross (GRC), GOAL, Green Mindanao, International Committee for the Red Cross and Red Crescent (ICRC), International Organization for Migration (IOM), Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW), National Housing Authority (NHA), Malteser International, Operation Blessing, Oxfam, Philippine Red Cross (PRC), Plan International, Polish Humanitarian Action (PAH), The Peace Project, World Vision, and Young Pioneer Disaster Response (YPDR). The following Philippine local government units: Municipality of Bantayan (Cebu), Municipality of Santa Fe (Cebu), City of Tacloban (Leyte), Municipality of Dagami (Leyte), Municipality of Tanauan (Leyte), Municipality of Jaro (Leyte), and Muncipality of Guiuan (Eastern Samar). This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1434791 and the United States Agency for International Development Office for Foreign Disaster Assistance and Habitat for Humanity International under Award No. Award No. AID- OFDA-G-16-00048. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation, the United States Agency for International Development Office for Foreign Disaster Assistance, or Habitat for Humanity International. For any questions, comments and requests regarding this report, contact Aaron Opdyke at aaron.opdyke@colorado.edu The Global Projects and Organizations (GPO) Research Group aims to improve lives by enhancing the resilience of communities through the study of complex infrastructure challenges, producing transformative research at the interface of the social and built environments. The Mortenson Center in Engineering for Developing Communities (MCEDC) advocates integrated and participatory solutions to humanitarian development by educating globally responsible engineering students and professionals, promoting research on developing community issues, and reaching out to build local capacity and resiliency in developing communities worldwide. MCEDC promotes sustainable development in areas such as water supply, hygiene and sanitation, shelter, food production and processing, energy, health, transportation, communication, income generation, and employment creation. Global Projects and Organizations Research Group Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering University of Colorado Boulder www.proj

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