• Document: TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES iii ix xi EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND HIGHLIGHTS 1 PART ONE 1. COSMETIC SURGERY MARKET Definition and history The market UK comparison
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TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD iii LIST OF TABLES ix LIST OF FIGURES xi EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND HIGHLIGHTS 1 PART ONE 1. COSMETIC SURGERY MARKET 13 1.1 Definition and history 13 1.2 The market 13 1.2.1 UK comparison with global trends 17 1.2.2 Demand and supply including regional variation 20 1.3 Funding 21 1.3.1 Financing cosmetic surgery 21 1.4 Demand drivers 23 1.5 Consumer buying behaviour 24 1.6 The role of the media 26 1.7 Marketing cosmetic surgery 27 1.7.1 Marketing non-surgical cosmetic treatments 28 1.7.2 Marketing hair restoration surgery 28 1.7.3 Relevance and value of brands 29 1.8 Operating and investment models 29 1.8.1 New market entrants and provider changes 30 1.9 Key operational statistics and performance measures 30 1.9.1 Outcome measures 32 1.10 Demographics 32 1.11 Cosmetic surgery tourism 33 1.11.1 European standards on cosmetic surgery 36 1.11.2 European standards on non-surgical medical procedures 37 1.11.3 The role of agents, brokers and third-party administrators 38 1.11.4 The Package Travel Directive 39 1.11.5 Pricing of cosmetic procedure outside the UK 41 1.11.6 Insurance for cosmetic surgery in Europe 41 2. COSMETIC SURGERY POLITICS AND REGULATION 43 2.1 Scope of independent acute medical care regulation in England 43 LaingBuisson Cosmetic Surgery, second edition v Table of Contents 2.2 The essential standards in England 44 2.3 CQC developments for independent acute hospitals and clinics 44 2.3.1 The CQC and the cosmetic market 45 2.3.2 CQC review of cosmetic providers 2019 46 2.3.3 The Keogh Review– what has changed? 48 2.3.4 Regulation and oversight – hair restoration 50 2.4 PHIN and performance data 51 2.5 The Nuffield Council on Bioethics review 2017 53 2.5.1 Controls on practitioners 53 2.5.2 Controls over premises 53 2.5.3 Controls over products 53 2.5.4 Young people’s access to cosmetic procedures 54 2.5.5 Tackling the wider social context 54 2.5.6 Advertising and marketing 54 2.5.7 Discrimination 54 2.6 The role of the Joint Council for Cosmetic Practitioners (JCCP) 54 2.7 Other regulatory bodies and those providing oversight 60 2.7.1 The Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority (CPSA) 61 2.7.2 The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) 61 2.7.3 The Independent Sector Complaints Adjudication Service (ISCAS) 61 2.7.4 The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) 62 2.8 Quality measures and guidance 62 2.8.1 The role of the NHS 64 2.8.2 The Breast and Cosmetic Implant Registry (BCIR) 65 2.9 Political oversight and influence 66 2.10 Quality and good practice guidance 67 2.11 Training for surgical and non-surgical practice 68 2.11.1 Training for hair restoration surgery 70 2.12 Understanding the role of regulation and legislation – the consumer perspective 70 3. COSMETIC SURGERY PAYORS 73 3.1 Price comparison for cosmetic surgery procedures 73 4. COSMETIC SURGERY MARKET INSIGHT 77 4.1 Overview 77 4.1.1 Demand and growth 77 4.1.2 Market segmentation and demographics 79 vi Cosmetic Surgery, second edition LaingBuisson Table of Contents 4.1.3 Influencing factors driving consumer demand 80 4.1.4 Changing role of marketing, adverti

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